Definitions

Communimetrics Theory: A Communication Theory
The core purpose of measurement in human services is how well the effort serves clients. However, the data exists in desolation therefore, must be communicated clearly between provider and client, provider and management and across systems. Innovative communimetrics measures have assisted more than 50,000 professionals worldwide in health care, justice, and business settings to deliver data that enhances communication on all sides, within the past decade.

Transformational Collaborative Outcome Management (TCOM)
Health Care in Human Services are often complex because of various different people involved in the process of care.    As a result of complex systems, participants will often have different perspectives and competing responsibilities and objectives.   “Transformational Collaborative Outcomes Management is a conceptual framework for managing complex systems.” The TCOM framework has a philosophy, a strategy, and a set of tactics designed to facilitate an effective and integrated approach to addressing the needs of people. The TCOM approach is established in the approach that the various perspectives in a complex service system does create conflict.  The results from strenuous conflicts are best managed by keeping a focus on a shared vision.  In human service organizations, the shared vision is the person or people provided with the service, including the child and family. When a system is created, anticipating to return to this shared vision, it is easier to create and manage effective and unbiased systems.

The CANS Adolescent Needs and Strengths (CANS)
The Child and Adolescent Needs and Strengths (CANS) is a multi-purpose tool designed for children’s services to support decision making such as: level of care, service planning, facilitating quality improvement initiatives, and to allow for the monitoring of outcomes of services.  There are currently fifty states using several versions of the CANS in child welfare, mental health, juvenile justice, and early intervention programs. The CANS was designed to be the link between the assessment process and the construct of individualized service plans utilizing evidence-based practices. The CANS is easy to learn and easy to understand as it does not necessarily require scoring in order to be meaningful to the child and family. The CANS works by suggesting different pathways for service planning for each item.

Adult Needs and Strength Assessment (ANSA)
The Adult Needs and Strengths Assessment (ANSA) is a multi-purpose tool designed for adult’s behavioral health services to support decision making such as; level of care, service planning, facilitating quality improvement initiatives, and to allow for the monitoring of outcomes of services.

The ANSA is currently used in a number of states and Canada in hospitals, emergency departments, psychosocial rehabilitation programs, and ACT programs. The ANSA was designed to be the link between the assessment process and the construct of individualized service plans utilizing  evidence-based practices. The ANSA expands on the concepts of the original version, the Severity of Psychiatric Illness (SPI), created in the 1990’s to study decision making in psychiatric emergency systems. The ANSA includes a broader description of functioning and strengths with a recovery focus. The ANSA is easy to learn and is easy to understand as it does not necessarily require scoring in order to be meaningful to an individual and his/her family. The ANSA works by suggesting different pathways for service planning for each item.

Family Advocacy and Support Tool (FAST) –
The Family Advocacy and Support Tool (FAST) is the family version of the CANS and ANSA tools. The FAST’s purpose is to support effective interventions on entire families rather than single individuals. The most prevalent use of the FAST addresses the needs of families who are at risk of child welfare involvement. Items identified by a ‘0’, ‘1’, ‘2’, or ‘3’ are used in strength-based planning, indication of needed monitoring and preventive care, or identified as actionable and should be addressed in the intervention plan.  The original version of the FAST, called the Multi-level Family Assessment, was designed to be used in a family therapy program to prevent child abuse and neglect. This tool was further developed into the FAST and is currently used in various programs in New York, Tennessee, and Illinois.